About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
CSPAN 11
CSPAN2 6
MSNBC 5
MSNBCW 5
CNNW 3
CNN 2
KGO (ABC) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 44
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
are important for the role of pakistan and many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for summer between six and ten minute roughly speaking and then we will open up to questions or dialogue with respect to the audience. we will start with jim, if you are ready, give you the floor. >> my response ability for afghanistan goes back to 2001 and is fair to say the time was present for creation of the current regime and i start by looking back and try to spot the things we did wrong at the time and it strikes me there were three fundamental errors two of which i perceive that the time and tried to do something about and one of which i failed to proceed entirely and did nothing about. one was the decision not to deploy any american or international peacekeepers in the country. we have a country with no police force and no army and we decided security would be an afghan responsibility after the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate.
pakistan, with respect to the important issues regarding the region. we called the event "back to the future." some people have spoken before about this, and what we mean by that. i think we will let that emerged as the discussion goes on. we know we have a lot of fundamental issues to talk about. certainly, military presence has been an issue talked about in the newspapers all lot. governance is an important issue. technical issues, such as what type of agreements might be signed between the u.s. and afghanistan, are important. the role of pakistan. many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for six to 10 minutes, roughly speaking. then we'll open it up to dialogue, with the audience. i will give you the floor. >> my responsibilities for afghanistan go back to 2001. it is fair to say i was present at the creation of at least the current regime in kabul. i started by looking back and trying to spot the things we did wrong. it strikes me that there were three fundamental errors, two of which are perceived at the time and tried to do someth
in pakistan. mullah nazir was known for plotting attacks against coalition troops. his death is considered a major blow to the taliban. but it could jeopardize u.s. relations with pakistan, as well because nazir, reportedly, had a truce with that country's military. >>> and the family of a missing journalist from new hampshire now confirms that he has been kidnapped in syria. james foley and another journalist, who has not been identified, haven't been heard from since november 22nd, underscoring the risk. the u.n. now estimates that more than 60,000 people have died in syria's civil war. >>> meanwhile, back in this country, a medical helicopter has crashed in iowa overnight, killing a pilot and two nurses flying from a hospital in mason city, to pick up a patient. there's no word yet on what may have caused the crash. we'll have updates as news becomes available. >>> in las vegas, two people were able to escape the fiery plane crash you see here. the twin-engine plane actually skidded off the runway and burst into flames. but both people onboard managed to crawl out before the fire engulf
died in that strike. it happened in pakistan's volatile tribal region in the province of south wazirstan. pakistani officials say the men were among 15 killed today in drone attacks. u.s. officials insists the use of unmanned aircraft with missiles is successful on to fight terrorist elements, but human rights groups says the number of civilians killed is too high. peter bergen joins us from washington. tell us about how the obama administration has relied on these drone strikes and what they've been able to accomplish. >> well, they've killed 37 leaders of al qaeda and the taliban, but they've also in the process killed hundreds of others. there's a controversy about how many civilians. i work at a foundation called the new america foundation where we track it carefully. we calculate there were five civilian deaths in 2012. that's not dissimilar to the accounts of other organizations that count these things. the civilian death toll has dropped remarkably in the last several years. in the 2004-2007 time frame it was about 60%. the reason is better intelligence, drones that fly
at the instability in pakistan. this is a real danger we have to think about in the future. if we ignore them, that is a prescription for getting more americans killed. host: i want to get your reaction to what the secretary of state had to say yes today. here's what she had to say. [video clip] guest: i think you would hear the same from the intelligence community or dod. the work that was done in afghanistan and pakistan, they have taken out a whole cadre of leadership. people have migrated back to other parts of the world who are affiliates, part of the jihad syndicate. they are extremists and have designs on overthrowing existing governments, control and territory. there has been the decimation of al qaeda in the afghanistan- pakistan region, we have to contend with the wannabes and the affiliate's going forward. host: any reaction? guest: there has been a loss of capacity on the part of al qaeda central and pakistan. because osama bin laden is dead, that doesn't mean allocate it is dead -- it does mean al qaeda is dead. they are very much alive. they have migrated. they are now seeing a
country elsewhere. >> right. although, when that didn't matter in pakistan, when they went after osama bin laden. the united states seems to go in when they want to go in. >> you know, in a situation like pakistan, where they took unilateral action, they were afraid, obviously, that the grade would have been compromised, had they let the local government know. this is a different situation now, and we've been working closely with the algerians, and i don't expect that this would be a unilateral type of situation. but as my colleague was saying, i know the offers are on the table, that, you know, any resources that can be brought to bear, to help the algerians resolve this thing are going to be readily available. >> all right. >> and this is a situation, quite frankly, that we might have been able to see coming. the person that was actually bearing responsibility for this, mokhtar belmokhtar actually made a video about a month ago saying, attacks are coming, expect it. so in essence, we should have been circling the wagons, expecting something like this to happen. >> all right. well, don an
was violence. drones dropping bombs on innocent people in pakistan is still violent. canada has roughly the same population as california. more californians kill each other with knives than canadians kill themselves with anything. so it's much deeper than just guns. we're talking about a culture and history, and that's why martin luther king's legacy is so important. >> jennifer: well, and of course guns are per vase nif a lot of communities struggling with poverty. what should we be doing to eliminate poverty in this country? >> very much like what the plt did today he said we're going to focus on gun. that's wonderful. behind it let's make poverty and let's make access to resources a priority. think about detroit, think about the south side of chicago. think about poor whites in appalachia, about what is going on in indian reservations. this kind of violence has been going on a long time among pour people. we have to have a much more comprehensive understanding of how we can access all of our citizens as well as human being around the world. >> jennifer: and the que
a suspectedu drone strike in pakistan's tribal areas. the target, three taliban compounds. it is believed two major commanders are among the dead, in the unsupervised bomb squads. that's the third u.s. drone strike in five days itch there was a sharp divide in congress between those who voted for the fiscal cliff bill and those who did not -- taxes versus spending. but will those differences come up again in the debt ceiling debate? we have jeff duncan, a republican from south carolina, and representative elliot engle, a democrat from new york. gentlemen, thank you for joining us. representative duncan, you voted against the fiscal cliff deal. tell us why? >> absolutely. we are not in this situation in america with our economy and our government because we have under-taxed americans. we are here because we spend too much money. this plan had over $40 of tax revenue increases for every dollar that was cult. it should be $44 for cuts fur every dollar increased. >> you voted for the deal, wiam sure, reservations, as many have excess expressed? >> you either accept the deal or go over the fiscal
and japan? i'm not sure about the muslim brotherhood aid but on pakistan that's been a big issue, both republicans and depps have said, we need to pare back that aid to pakistan. senator rand paul has been pushing that. others like senator john mccain say, we can't just cut them off. foreign aid is very important if we want to get them to do what we want them to do and foster democracy. host: before we let you go here, we're going to take another phone cull, but tell us the fresh minnesota class, some names and faces people should be looking out for, people who might make a name for themselves in the 113th? guest: one is senator tim kaine, he beat george allen in the election, a former governor, he's close to president obama. he was almost picked as vice president. obama and kain talked about him running in the senate, then he ended up winning. that's a democrat to watch. you have to watch the democrats in the senate. elizabeth warren won a huge battle with senator scott broun. -- scott brown. how is she going to operate? the financial industry is a little nervous about elizabeth warre
where we thought they were, like in afghanistan and pakistan, and taken their act on the road. >> right. >> certain areas of the world it's a lot tougher to get to. >> not only have they packed up their act. these elements existed -- only these larger leaders and stronger leaders have ensured that these stockpiles of weapons and the money they collected actually from ransom money from other kidnapping and these funds there are and the weapons are there, and they sent theirs best leaders to these parts of the world so they only have better access to launch attacks on the west. >> scary stuff. thank you for filling it out for a dummy like me. it is amazing when you connect the dots. >> once this dreamliner nightmare is over. will it be on fliers' minds, and now a gig of her on tv. fox on top of an athletes girlfriend cashing in, and another athletes career spinning out. she's everything to you. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be
campaign in pakistan. more evidence that the followers are making north africa and yemen the base of operation. >> this is a fox news alert. state department put out word hillary clinton was discharged from the hospital. the medical team advises she is making good progress on all fronts and confident she will make a full recovery from the blood clot in her skull. we were told she had not been released though we had photo of video of her outside the hospital today now. the state department put out official release she has been released from the hospital. fox all-stars weigh in on a big fight op capitol hill next. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? >>> i'm give
in pakistan. >> and it's happened in pakistan. and the long-term impact -- i've said here -- the long-term impact of indiscriminately dropping, you know, bombs on civilians to kill terrorists. >> right. >> has long-term implications for us. we're going to be paying for as a country for decades to come. >> there's a short-term benefit, but the long-term consequences that people not liking americans are feeling that america isn't back to predator nation. >> it's beyond that. you kill my 4-year-old daughter, i don't just not like you. >> yeah. >> i spend the rest of my life trying to destroy you. and that's happening. again, it's not just happening in countries where we have declared war. we're now going into country after country after country. and i guess, rick, what i don't understand is where are the civil liberties lawyers, the constitutional lawyers that were so concerned during the bush administration, for good reason, about how far we push the boundaries in the war on terror? where are those people now that we are killing innocent civilians across the world? >> well, we're still
in a moment.  >>> happening now, a rise in the number of measles cases in children in pakistan. the world health organization says 300 children died from the disease in 2012 compared to 64 in 2011. a pakistani health official says the disease hit hardest in poorer communities in and around the country where families did not vaccinate their kids. now many pakistanis, especially in rural areas see vaccines as a western plot to sterilize muslims. pakistani officials are now launching an immunization campaign to prevent further outbreaks. >>> a new year's celebration on the ivory coast took a tragic turn. 61 people were killed and more than 200 hurt when revelers panicked after a fireworks display and started a stampede outside a stadium. many of the dead were children and teenagers. the ivory coast president and his wife toured a hospital where many survivors are being treated. he declared a day of mourning. >>> the hunt is still on for four masked gunmen who robbed an apple store in paris, france. they forced their way into the store three hours after closing time on new year's
or dod. the work that has been done in afghanistan and the borders area between afghanistan, pakistan, certainly has taken out a whole caught die ofdcadre of leadership. what we're seeing people who have migrated back to other parts of the world where they came from primarily who are in effect affiliates. part of the jihadist syndicate. some of them like al qaeda in the islamic maghreb use that name, others use different names but the fact is they are terrorists. they are extremes. they have designs on overthrowing existing government, even these new islamist governments of controlling territories of the so although there has been the decimation of core al qaeda in the afghanistan, pakistan region, we do have to contend with the wannabes and the affiliates going forward. >> thank you, madam. >> senator udall. >> thank you, mr. chairman and thank you, madam secretary, for being here and it's great, great to see you today. you have been, i think, a real dedicated public servant for this country and your travels around the world, as many have talked about it. the millions miles you've pu
afghanistan, pakistan? guest: the group in northern mali, it is making the news these days, is very closely tied. al qaeda and islamic maghrib were the first real franchise of al qaeda outside the middle east and south asia. this group had been formed in the 1990's to fight to overthrow the government of algeria. it metastasized over time. of syrians in north africa were the largest group present foreign fighters into iraq during the first stage of the u.s. presence over there. that led to five years ago when it formally allied itself with al qaeda, the first franchise. there's no direct command and control from al qaeda central, but they draw from the same equality and inspiration and one could argue and that they have been the most effective in recent days. host: here's a headline from the wall street journal -- why should americans care what is happening in mali? guest: this has become the most attractive place for jihadist around the world to gather especially since the french intervention occurred three weeks ago. foreign fighters coming into the region not only from across africa, but
by pakistani authorities in pakistan. others were arrested in thailand by the police. you had nashiri who was arrested in to buy another arrested in somalia. the notion that we have to have the special forum that has battlefield conditions is a great smokescreen for this second-rate process that says more about us than about the people we are trying to bring before us. another important piece is the issue of torture. the senate select committee on intelligence completed their report recently and you probably saw john mccain and dianne feinstein said the report concludes torture did not work. they say it was a stain on our reputation. it is important that that report is declassified to the public in light of "zero dark 30." it is about the killing of osama bin laden bin laden. i think the movie will do for torture with jaws did for sharks. it will become the public perception of reality and it is a lie. i think that moving makes it doubly important for the senate select committee to report -- to get the report declassified so the public can have a debate on the truth and not this hollywood
was in pakistan a couple weeks ago, and we heard for ourselves there was political impact and drones and the way they were exploited, very visibly in the uprunning up to the election, and you know the next 30 american women to the drone impact sites and used a powerful attack on american engagement. i wanted to know if you could give reaction to the argument that they are worried that the missile technology control regime is damming the market for drones, and they are looking for some kind of relaxation so, i mean, can you tell us what -- i know what the policy is in relation to drone activity and pakistan, but on the wider use of drones and the extent to which you feel that the system we have is adequate to control, particularly those who supply components. >> well, the controls on the empty fee are, the controls of the exports of uavs are strong, and those capable of traveling beyond the range of only 300 kilometers and carrying a payload above 500 kilograms are subject, as i'm sure you know, to a strong presumption of denial where an advocate of strong control and partners feel that we've ens
is david headley. he was born in the united states. his mother is american. his father is from pakistan. the thing that made david headley most valuable to the terrorist groups that trained him was that he was an american, which meant that he could travel easily all over the world without attracting suspicion thanks to his american passport. when the ten attackers arrived in india for the mumbai terrorist attack, none of them had ever been to that city before, but they were able to pull off this highly coordinated, highly mobile multisite attack in a strange city they didn't know because of david headley. they knew exactly where to go because david headley had scouted everything for them. he had given them meticulously prepared videos and reports and gps coordinates about how to wage that assault on that city in november 2008. david headley was not arrested until almost a year after the attack in october 2009. u.s. officials picked him up at o'hare airport in chicago when he was en route to denmark in the midst of planning a second mumbai-style attack. the attack in denmark was going to
mongerer from pakistan? >> reporter: the catchy phrase has hooked people into the new year. the clip reeled in more than 16 million views on youtube and already is an itunes hit. >>> fish man, we have to come up with something. >> that's a lot. >> yes, indeed. >> what's coming up in sports? >> great sports. terps trying to keep their winning streak alive. after a record breaking the red test in the seahawks. that's all when "news4 at 6:00" continues. >>> hello. welcome back. i'm doug kammerer. not a bad day on january 1. we start off the year 2013, temperatures a little bit above average. 45 degrees. temperature right now. our average temperature is 44 for a high temperature today. not too bad. winds out of the northwest, 8 miles per hour. we continue to see the cloud cover. those clouds may hold the temperatures up a little bit tonight. that's good news. tomorrow night they are going to be hold. 39 in gaithersburg. 44 in college park. 42 towards camp springs. friends in warrenton, hello to you. 39 degrees. how about front royal. front royal coming in at 38 degrees. starting to see t
. and iran and pakistan, other countries have acquired them and we live with them and we tend not to think about them too much. what would it take to get rid of them? the thesis he put out in this, it's guy -- goats doing take some disaster or mishaps before the world really wakes up and says we really need to do something about this. in his fantasy and it really is just a fantasy, it's a thought experiment, not a prediction. in 20 or 25 years, there someone in the pakistan in that ongoing conflict will trigger a nuclear bomb which will set off kind of quasi nuclear winter and do damage to the power gid. when you set off a nuclear bomb, you cause an electromagnetic pulse which can damage power grid. as you know, power grids are essential. significant damage to power grids that can cause a lot of casualties. in his scenario, some small, some minor mishaps occurs. after that people think, gee, this is really serious and we need to get rid of these weapons. at the end of his piece the world is a safer place. the problems of the world are tough. they're not always cheery to contemplate. host:
a diplomat since 1975 and served previously in pakistan, tunesia, saudi arabia, oman and israel. the bounty is on the table for six months and a middle east research institute has been tracking several twitter accounts being used by al qaeda in the arabian peninsula to spread the word about this offer to assassinate firestein. on twitter these terrorists have been using a hash tag that translates to al qaeda's reward. in addition to this $160,000 bounty for the ambassador, there is a separate $23,000 bounty being offered to anyone who kills an american soldier in yemen. the middle east media research institute points out that social media is becoming more and more popular with these terrorists because the forums they had been using on-line are being shut down and this news about a bounty on the head of a u.s. ambassador in yemen comes a little less than four months after the u.s. ambassador to libya, chris stevens, was murdered along with three other americans during a deadly raid on the u.s. consolate in benghazi, libya. a state department spokesman would not comment to bloomberg news abou
in part because over the last years, we have become accustomed in operating in pakistan, in iraq and afghanistan and yemen and elsewhere. and we do, as by necessity, rely on security officials to implement the protocols and procedures necessary to keep our people safe. and as i said in my opening statements, i have a lot of confidence in them, because most of the time they get it right. but i was also engaged -- and think this is what deputy secretary burns was referring to, in the issues related to the deteriorating threaten virmente, particularly in libya -- there were other places across the region we were also watching -- to try to see what we could do to support the libyan government to improve the overall stability of their country to deal with the many militias. we have many programs and actions that we were working on. i had a number of conversations with leading libyan officials. i went to libya in october of 2011. in fact shortly before the attack on benghazi, we approved libya for substantial funding from a joint state-d.o.d. account, c.t. capabilities and w.m.d. effor
by hurricane sandy but to it cuts into foreign aid with the exception of israel afghanistan or pakistan to shift those moneys to instead be spent on american aid it is a substantive because the amount is of unknown for what has been spent on foreign-aid the reason i submit the pay for is of the precarious position the government sees itself. we're on a path to know where financially. then said of the fiscal cliff we have a debt mountain, a $16 trillion of total debt and ane
about the a rather good aid, but on pakistan, republicans and democrats a we need to payback that aid. rand paul has really been pushing that. others like senator john mccain say we cannot just cut them off. foreign aid is very important if you want to get them to do what we want them to do and foster democracy. guest: before we let you go, bob cusack, we'll take another phone call. tell us about the freshman class and who are some names, faces people should be looking out for, people might make a name for themselves. guest: senator tim kaine is a democrat from virginia. he defeated george allen in the election. he is a former governor. this is very close to president obama. he was almost vice-president. talk about your money in the senate. elizabeth warren won a huge battle with senator scott brown. how will she going to operate? the financial industry is a little bit nervous about her. she had the idea to come up with the consumer bureau that was so controversial, the agency that is now up and running as far as wall street reform. those two have strong personalities. they could also
, afghanistan and pakistan. so every other country in the world, we are under the kind of contracting rules that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats, unfortunately, are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend to the d.r.c. or somalia? >> i would certainly recommend. there was an article in one of the newspapers today that went into some detail basically here's how it started. for more than two decades the federal laws required them to select the cheapest rather than the best security abroad and there's that old saying, you get what you pay for and that lowest price provision started enough 19t 90 and has just stayed with us and i would respectfully request that this committee look at it. you cannot do a total lifting but at least look at the high risk areas and the countries you're naming are the countries that i think would fall into that category. well, thank you very much. among the various islamic extremist groups, in your view, which pose the great estill
was in pakistan and afghanistan a few years ago and we were consulting over the phone. he played an instrumental role in working with president karzai at that time to accept the results of the election and to move forward. hi to call harry reid and ask harry not to schedule any votes so john could see that mission through. but that's what he does. he's a determined and effective representative of the united states, has been as a senator, will be as secretary. let me close by saying that leading our diplomats and development experts is a great honor and every day, as i testified yesterday, i've seen firsthand their skill, their bravery, unwavering commitment to our country. i've been proud to call them colleagues and to serve as secretary of state and i'm very pleased that john will be given the chance, subject to confirmation, to continue the work of a lifetime on behalf of our country. thank you. >> thank you, madam secretary. senator mccain? >> mr. chairman, i'm pleased to be here with secretary warren and secretary clinton to introduce and speak, say a few words about my friend, senator kerry
to pakistan and some countries that probably none of us know where he went. there are many times he's come to me and said, i've got to go, and he tells me where he's going, thouing in the newspapers about -- nothing in the newspapers about where he'd gone. but he is a great evaluator of people, and because of that, the president trusts him and has sent him on all these missions. now he will do that as secretary of state. he's authored numerous pieces of legislation to prevent the global spread of h.i.v. aids. he also played a central role in crafting our policy in iraq and afghanistan in the war on traimpleterror. i can remember one time where he spent days and days with president karzai working 0en a difficult issue following the elections that they had there. he'he's been focused on the mide east peace process and israel's security forays entire time on the foreign relations committee. for more than 30 years senator kerry has been a powerful voice for his constituents in massachusetts as well as an engaged citizen of the world. throughout those years john has matched his u unflinching pa
pakistan. they deserve better. they deserve much better. our commander in chief has been on television yesterday talking about the debt limit, debt ceiling. he's talked about our economy. i think it's worth noting that since 1923, when the president was required to furnish a budget in a time deadline given for furnishing that budget, 90 years, 90 years the president is required by law to furnish a budget. since 1923 those, those ensuing 90 years, there were apparently 11 times when presidents have been unable to get the budget to congress as required by law. and most of those -- well, some of those 11, there were very good reasons. but it's interesting to note in the last 90 years, out of the 11 times that the budget from the president has been late, four of those 11 have been under the obama administration. we're also informed that there is a chance once again, like there was a year and a half ago, that our credit rating of the u.s. could be lowered again. by another credit rating agency. some have tried to paint it as a different story, different picture, but for those of us who reca
their information, pay for the transaction pakistan and the line and get their photo taken. so there were huge security process change that we have to make. the right now when you come into the dmv the first thing to do is you get your photo taken. it's running a facial recognition check while you're getting the rest of your information provided. real-time social security checks, real-time immigration checks, and again capturing that photo is crucial for us. every front-line dmv employee has had a full criminal background check, and annual fraudulent document recognition training. we have state-of-the-art equipment, trained employees, and it's been working very, very well for us. the federal real id act is very, very specific about the security of the actual card stock and equipment used to make the license. so in each one of our facilities we have what we call a secure room, which is a little overkill in my opinion but this bulletproof walls, bulletproof glass, special security requirements to get into those rooms. and all of the equipment, whether it is printer ribbon, everything that you ca
control and verification, building lasting ties with pakistan and perhaps in his most personal contribution, opening up diplomatic relations with vietnam. i'd like to speak to that for a moment if i can because it's a personal story that i'd like to share. it was john kerry and john mccain more than any others who really moved us from that stage in our history where we shunned the people of vietnam to the point where we recognized their country, established normal relations with them and built a new relationship. there were no better senators to do it than john kerry and john mccain, both of whom were decorated veterans of the vietnam war, both of whom gave so much in that conflict, particularly senator mccain, spending five years as a prisoner of war in vietnam. but they worked hard to establish normal relations with that country and to put behind the bitterness and the war that had divided the two countries, the united states and vietnam. it wasn't easy, and one of the issues front and center in this was a question of prisoners of war and missing in action. there were all sor
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)